The best Lusophone representation

The best Lusophone representation

Inventa International is established in all the jurisdictions covered by the Lusophone Nations, namely Angola, Brazil, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Macao, Mozambique, Portugal, Sao Tome & Principe and Timor Leste.
Read More
Premium IP services in Africa

Premium IP services in Africa

Inventa International is established in a number of locations throughout mainland Africa and its islands. We also have a great network of local representatives in countries where we don't operate directly.
Read More
IP Protection in the EU

IP Protection in the EU

Inventa International is specialised in the protection of Community Trademarks (CTM), Registered Community Designs (RCD) and European Patents (EP), including the upcoming European Unitary Patent.
Read More
Innovation, Our Passion

Innovation, Our Passion

Protecting your Intellectual Property is what we most treasure. You can trust us all of your creations and innovative ideas, including Patents, Trademarks, Designs, Copyright and Domain Names.
Read More About our Services
Global Network

Global Network

Inventa International is established in several countries and works with associated offices all over the world. Our representatives will take care of your Intellectual Property according to each country's law.
Read More About our Network
Inventa International Celebrating 40 YearsInventa International specialises in Intellectual Property (IP) protection, including Trademarks, Patents, Designs, Copyrights and Domain Names. We advise clients on national and international searches and registrations, licenses and commercial transactions, enforcement, litigation and maintenance of all kinds of IP Rights.

Founded in 1970, and holding a growing network of offices and local representatives, Inventa International provides specialist IP services for clients all around the world, with special emphasis throughout the E.U., Africa and the Lusophone Countries.

Apple loses ‘iPhone’ trademark to leather goods company in China

Apple loses ‘iPhone’ trademark to leather goods company in China

A Chinese court has ruled against Apple in a case over the use of the ‘iPhone’ trademark claiming that the Californian company failed to prove the term was “familiar to the public and widely known” at the time of registration. The trademark ‘iPhone’ was registered by the Chinese company Xintong Tiandi Technology Co. in 2007 on the same year the iPhone was launched, although it was not available in China until 2009. The company is a leather manufacturer that commercialises leather goods such as phone cases, purses, handbags and wallets.

Chelsea to Man. United: You can have the coach, but not his name

Chelsea to Man. United: You can have the coach, but not his name

It is official, as from today, (27/05/16) José Mourinho is officially Manchester United’s new manager. An announcement such as this would normally call for a celebration for “sealing the deal”, but for the executives responsible for the transfer there is still unsettled issues that need to be pondered and addressed.

Booking.com sues USPTO due to trademark rejection

Booking.com sues USPTO due to trademark rejection

The concept of keeping things as ‘simple and concise’ as possible in business and commercial affairs is frequently endorsed by marketing strategists as being the sure proof path to gaining visibility and the attention of the public. However, said strategy also carries an amount of risk when it comes to obtaining a trademark registration.

Justin Bieber & Skrillex sued for copyright infringement over 'Sorry'

Justin Bieber & Skrillex sued for copyright infringement over 'Sorry'

Canadian popstar Justin Bieber and American music producer Skrillex are being sued by an indie pop singer that performs under the stage name White Hinterland due to an alleged copyright violation.

White Hinterland, whose real name is Casey Dienel claims both Bieber and Skrillex made unauthorised use of her vocal loop on the hit song “Sorry”. According to Dienel, the vocal riff present in her song “Ring the Bell” which was released in 2014 is the same riff that can be heard in Biber’s most recent track. Dienel further claims that she attempted to raise awareness over the similarity on both tracks, but states that her concerns fell on deaf ears within Biber’s party.